NEED HELP NOW? CALL 1-800-273-TALK(8255)
TEXT 'Help' to 741741


Parents Can make a Difference! (Kids Count® – a project of the Annie E. Casey Foundation). You can make a difference, and being involved in suicide prevention in your community, school, church, home and family is important and can be a protective factor. Parental support can be the difference between hope and despair. Go ahead! Start the Conversation.

1. How do I talk to my own child about suicide/suicide prevention > Learn more here.
  • Talk to your kids to establish that they can talk to you
  • You already teach them lifeskills and they are accustomed to learning from you
  • Talking about suicide won’t plant the idea, and
  • If you don’t talk to them and teach them, who will?
2. How do I respond to a cry for help?  > Learn more here.
  • Breathe! Be genuine, caring, and show respect.
  • Don’t lie or make promises you can’t keep.
  • Tell them: “I am glad you came to me”, “I do care, how can I help?”
3. I want to help the Yellow Ribbon Suicide Prevention Program. What can I do?
  • Become a member of the Program (linked to Membership form)
  • Volunteer (link to volunteer pdf and the volunteer form pdf) (being finished)
  • Join our Speakers Bureau and give talks to teen groups. (Speaker’s Bureau trainings available)
  • Help with the administrative side of things – stuff packets, make phone calls, etc.
4. I want to do something at my school. What can I do? > Learn more here.
  • Talk to the School Board, Principal, Counselors, PTA, and other school personnel about why you feel your school needs suicide prevention and tell them about this program. If you would like to host Dale and Dar Emme in person, contact 303.429.3530
  • Hold a parent night or community forum; many parents are unaware that there is a suicide problem at all, let alone a possible problem with their own child. This “not my kid” syndrome is common and is a battle to overcome.
  • Always have the Ask 4 Help cards available and make them available around the school (counseling office, administrative office, gym, etc.)
5. I have started a chapter in my community. How can I get the word out? > Learn more here.
6. I am teaching a class/seminar on suicide prevention and would like to include something about the Yellow Ribbon program. What ideas/materials can you give me?Link: ‘Sharing YR in your training’ > Learn more here.
7. How can I get Yellow Ribbon Cards?
8. I want to share this story with others. Has it ever been written about? Yes, in a number of places, including:
  • A 3rd Serving of Chicken Soup for the Soul, 1996, – “For the Love of a Child”
  • Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul, 1997, – “I’ll Always Be with You” (Best source for sharing the story)
  • Family Circle Magazine, 8/4/98, – “Light for Life – Women Who Make a Difference”
  • More articles about Yellow Ribbon (Link: ‘Yellow Ribbon articles page’ with links to articles) (being finished)

The Yellow Ribbon Program is based on the premise that suicide is not just about death, but rather about being in unending pain and that it’s OK to ask for help. Yellow Ribbon cards are distributed and carried as a simple, effective tool to use to ask for help when feelings of suicide arise. The card has proven to be a lifeline because it is a reminder to young people that they have permission to ask for help, it helps them talk when they may not have the words and it tells the recipient of the card how to help the suicidal person. Thanks to Yellow Ribbon Chapter of Southern California for contributing to this page.